Is Your Toothpaste Right for You?

If you’re like the majority of the population you probably stick to the same brand of toothpaste, or maybe you choose the one that’s on special offer at the supermarket or in the chemists. But is it always the best choice, or is there something else out there that might suit you little better? This is something we get asked quite often at Leeds City Dentalcare so we have put together a quick overview of the most popular types available. It’s true the choice can be confusing, and toothpaste can be bought in several different forms including gel, paste and powder. However some of the ingredients are quite similar and include:

  • Some sort of flavouring or sweetener to improve the taste. Most toothpastes are mint flavoured, but it is possible to find alternatives if you hate the taste of mint.
  • Some sort of agent to help the paste or gel stay moist.
  • Most contain thickening agents to give them the right texture.
  • Your toothpaste may have some sort of mild abrasive designed to help remove surface stains, excess food particles and plaque.
  • Ever wondered why your toothpaste foams up when you use it? This is because it’s likely to contain some sort of detergent.

So now you know what’s in them, but what are they all supposed to do? The most common types of toothpaste include:

Fluoride toothpaste

Most people will choose to use toothpaste containing fluoride, and it’s something we’re likely to recommend our Leeds dental surgery patients use regularly. Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally, it’s found in certain foods, and may be present in some people’s water supplies. It’s a great ingredient as it helps to harden the tooth enamel and protects the teeth from decay. This helps to lessen the chances of acid erosion. Whenever you brush your teeth some of the fluoride ions will remain in the saliva for quite some time afterwards, helping to prolong the protective effects. It’s best to simply spit out excess toothpaste after brushing rather than rinsing your mouth with water. If you have children under the age of two then ask Dr David Brown or another of our dentists for advice on using fluoride toothpaste. It’s possible we may recommend using non-fluoride toothpaste until they are old enough to be able to spit out the excess.

Tartar control toothpaste

This type of toothpaste is designed to help prevent the build-up of tartar on the teeth. Tartar is sometimes called calculus, and consists of hardened plaque bacteria that haven’t been removed through brushing and flossing. This is the substance that is gently scraped away by your hygienist during visits to our Leeds dental surgery. It’s important to try to control the build-up of tartar as it can irritate and inflame the gums, leading to infection and disease. Toothpastes designed to control the build-up of tartar generally contain anti-plaque agents such as zinc citrate or pyrophosphates. You’ll generally find that most tartar control toothpastes also contain fluoride.

Toothpaste for sensitive teeth

Lots of our patients have sensitive teeth, and it can help to use the toothpaste designed to tackle this problem. Sensitivity can be caused by areas of dentine becoming exposed. Dentine contains lots of tiny tubules that lead to the centre of the tooth where all the nerves are located, allowing foods to penetrate the tooth more easily. This toothpaste works by helping to block up these tiny tubules, reducing sensitivity. You’ll probably need to use the toothpaste for several weeks for optimum results.

Whitening toothpaste

Whitening toothpastes are very popular, but most don’t contain bleach. Instead they contain a very mild abrasive designed to remove surface stains. They won’t really make much difference, but can help to freshen up a smile. If you’re interested in teeth whitening then you may want to make an appointment with Dr. David Brown or another dentist in Leeds City Dentalcare to find out about having them professionally whitened.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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What is a Dental Bridge?

Dental bridges are used to literally bridge the gaps created by one or more missing teeth in your mouth. It’s a way of permanently filling the space left by a missing tooth, and dental bridges in Leeds are cemented firmly into place and cannot be removed. We find many of our patients at our Leeds dental surgery prefer this option as opposed to having a partial denture that can move around or even fall out.

Bridges can be made out of a variety of different materials and consist of a crown or crowns constructed to fit over the tooth or teeth adjacent to the gap. The actual missing tooth is replaced by something called a pontic that is attached to the crown(s). Bridges can be constructed out of gold alloy, or they may have as metal alloy substructure that’s been covered with porcelain that exactly matches the shade of your remaining teeth. Nowadays more and more people are opting for all ceramic bridges that don’t contain any metal and which gives excellent cosmetic results.

Why is it Important to Replace Missing Teeth?

It might seem as if the reasons for replacing missing teeth are mainly cosmetic, but this wouldn’t be strictly true. If you have lost teeth it’s highly likely the teeth adjacent to the gap will begin to shift around into the space. This means you could be left with other unsightly gaps in between your teeth. It also affects the teeth in your opposing jaw, as without anything to bite against these will begin to over-erupt. Having one or more missing teeth also places unwanted stresses on your remaining teeth as they will be subjected to extra forces every time you bite or chew. You may also find it difficult to eat the foods you like, and this could have a detrimental effect on your overall diet as it’s likely to be less varied.

What is the Procedure for Having a Dental Bridge?

The first thing to do is to book a consultation with Dr. David Brown or another one of our dentist in Leeds City Dentalcare. We’ll need to give you a full examination to check the teeth either side of the gap are healthy and strong enough to take a bridge. There are several types of bridges that may be suitable, as some utilise both of the teeth either side of the gap, while others are only fixed onto one tooth, something that is called a cantilever bridge. There’s also a third type of bridge which is called a Maryland bridge and which is fixed onto the tooth adjacent to the gap with something that looks a little like a wing. We will also discuss all the different options for materials that may be used to make your bridge. All ceramic bridges do tend to be a bit more expensive than other options, but are especially good for replacing teeth that are highly visible whenever you smile or talk.

The actual procedure does require some tooth structure to be removed from the tooth or teeth adjacent to the space. You’ll be given a local anesthetic while the teeth are prepared, and an impression will be taken to send to our laboratory. It usually takes a couple of weeks for the bridge to be constructed, after which you can return to our Leeds dental surgery to have it fitted. Once we’re sure the fit is perfect it’ll be permanently cemented into place. You’ll need to take care to clean it thoroughly, especially under the pontic area as food can sometimes become trapped here.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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Getting Treatment for Dry Mouth at Leeds City Dentalcare

Dry mouth is caused by a lack of saliva, and the correct medical term for this condition is xerostomia. It’s a very uncomfortable condition, but can also put the sufferer at increased risk of developing dental diseases such as gum disease and tooth decay. It also increases the risk of other diseases such as fungal infections and thrush. Saliva has an important role to play in keeping the mouth healthy and fresh.

The Importance of Saliva to Oral Health

Saliva not only keeps the mouth comfortable, but also enables it to remain healthy as it helps to wash away excess plaque bacteria and excess pieces of food that could otherwise linger in the mouth creating potential problems. Every time we eat the pH levels in the mouth become more acidic due to the presence of plaque bacteria. This acid can soften the tooth enamel and can lead to dental problems. Having plenty of saliva helps ensure pH levels return to normal more quickly and the saliva can contain important minerals that help to re-harden teeth. Saliva has another important role to play while eating, as it contains an enzyme that aids digestion, helping to break down food before it is swallowed. A lack of saliva can make swallowing much more difficult.

Dry mouth can be caused by a number of different things, and it may be purely temporary or can be permanent. It can often be more prevalent in older people. Common causes include:

  • As a side effect of taking certain prescription or non-prescription drugs. Certain cold medications, pain relief medications, antidepressants and allergy medications can cause xerostomia. They can also be caused by a huge number of other drugs including those commonly described for Parkinson’s disease. If you think you may have dry mouth due to certain prescription medications than it’s worth discussing it with your doctor in Leeds, but obviously you should never stop taking prescription medications without first seeking medical advice.
  • Dry mouth can also be caused by a number of illnesses including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease and HIV AIDS.
  • Sometimes it can be due to damage to the salivary glands, especially if someone has received treatment for head and neck cancers. These glands can also be damaged due to trauma, or during surgery.
  • Occasionally it’s necessary for the salivary glands to be surgically removed due to specific medical conditions.
  • Sickness and diarrhea can cause temporary dry mouth.
  • Xerostomia can also be due to smoking or chewing tobacco.

Visit Our Leeds Surgery If You Think You May Have Dry Mouth

If you’ve noticed you’re thirstier than usual, or that you have more difficulty in chewing and swallowing or that your throat is frequently sore then you may have xerostomia. Other common symptoms include noticing you have developed bad breath or that your lips are frequently chapped or cracked. In this case it’s well worth booking a check-up with Dr David Brown at Leeds City Dentalcare.

There are a number of things our dentist in Leeds can do to help you increase the flow of saliva. One of the things we might do is to describe an artificial saliva substitute to help you feel more comfortable, but there are a number of other things to try as well. If you are a smoker then it’s well worth trying to quit or least cut down to see if it helps to improve your symptoms.

Other things that can be useful include sucking on sugar-free sweets, or chewing sugar-free gum to help stimulate the flow of saliva. Making sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day will help, and it is a good idea to check your bedroom isn’t too dry during the night. If it is then you may want to invest in a room humidifier, or simply place a bowel of water in the room overnight to increase humidity. Some people also find it helpful to cut back on alcohol and caffeine, as well as fizzy drinks.

Make sure you visit Leeds City Dentalcare regularly for checkups and cleanings, as this will help to minimise the risk of you developing dental diseases due to xerostomia. We may also recommend you use additional products containing fluoride to help protect your teeth and gums.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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What is the connection between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

We put a strong emphasis on preventative dental treatment at Leeds City Dentalcare as we believe it is better to prevent periodontal disease or gum disease from occurring, or to be able to treat it early before it can cause significant damage. Periodontal disease doesn’t only damage the teeth and gums, but can also affect general health. There have been numerous studies into the link between periodontal disease and overall health, and although many of the mechanisms aren’t yet known, there is a significant connection.

Gum disease is estimated to affect a large percentage of the population to some degree or other during their lifetime, and while it’s very easy for our Leeds dental surgery to treat it as a in the early stages, it becomes far more serious if allowed to develop into periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition caused by toxins produced by plaque bacteria in the mouth. It can create open wounds in the mouth allowing plaque bacteria to enter the bloodstream where they can travel freely around the body, potentially creating further sites of inflammation.

A healthy person may be able to deal with the type of inflammation, as their immune system will respond to the attack. Someone whose general health is compromised is less able to fight off this inflammation. Periodontal disease has been linked to a number of other serious health conditions, including diabetes.

Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

Diabetes is becoming far more prevalent, and many diabetics will also suffer from some degree of gum disease, while up to a third will have periodontal disease. Diabetics aged over the age of 45 are nearly 3 times as likely to have severe periodontal disease compared to people without this condition.  Diabetes is a systemic disease and it affects the whole body, weakening the immune system. One of the side effects of diabetes is that it can cause the blood vessels to become thickened which means the body is less able to transport essential nutrients to tissues to aid repair and healing. It’s also more difficult for toxins and waste products to be removed.A healthy person is more able to fight off periodontal disease but a diabetic is less able to do this and the problems it can cause can be quite considerable.

Once plaque bacteria enter the bloodstream they can make it more difficult for diabetics to control blood sugar levels. The reason for this isn’t exactly known but it’s thought the inflammation could increase insulin resistance. In addition a diabetic’s saliva may contain more glucose which only helps plaque bacteria to thrive. It really is a bit of a vicious cycle. Being in poor oral health can make it difficult or even painful to eat which again can make it tricky eat a balanced diet and to regulate blood sugar levels properly.

Taking Extra Care of Oral Health

Anyone who is diabetic may need to attend our Leeds surgery more frequently for checkups and cleanings. This will help our dentists pick up any signs of gum disease, hopefully before it can create significant problems. Regular cleanings help to reduce the number of plaque bacteria present in the mouth so there’s less chance they can create infection and inflammation. It is also vitally important to have a great daily oral hygiene routine which should include flossing. Diabetics with periodontal disease may find it very uncomfortable or even painful to floss, and may wish to try an alternative method of cleaning in between the teeth such as using a WaterPik. The dentist in Leeds dental surgery will be able to advise patients on the best method for them.

Diabetes isn’t the only condition to be linked to periodontal disease, as it’s also thought to have a connection with heart disease, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis, and has even been linked to one recent study even linked it to impotence.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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Wisdom Teeth, Problems and Extraction

Wisdom teeth are well known for causing problems, and this is something we often see in our Leeds surgery. Wisdom teeth are the third molars, and generally begin erupting from the age of 17 onwards, but they may not erupt fully until some people are well into their 20s and they may never erupt in others. They are called wisdom teeth precisely because they come through when we’re a little older, and supposedly a little wiser. The reason we have wisdom teeth dates back to a time when our diet was a lot rougher and harder to chew, but this isn’t exactly the case nowadays. In fact people’s jaws have evolved to become smaller, and this can cause problems when they do try to erupt as there is simply insufficient room for them to do so.

Common Problems Caused by Wisdom Teeth

One of the most common problems is that the wisdom teeth try to erupt underneath existing teeth, or that they partially erupt. When this happens it’s quite common for food and bacteria to get trapped in the gum tissue, increasing the risk of tooth decay and gum disease Leeds. This can be quite a problem, as many people find it difficult to clean their teeth thoroughly this far back in the mouth, and signs of disease can go undetected.

Sometimes an impacted wisdom tooth can cause a cyst to form in the soft tissue, and these can be potentially quite serious as they can damage the teeth and bones nearby.

On dental team here at Leeds City Dentalcare will be keeping an eye on your wisdom teeth at every visit, and if we think they may cause problems then we’ll recommend they are extracted. It’s often better to have them extracted sooner rather than later, as the teeth can fuse to the bones later in life making extraction more complex.

This may seem a little strange, especially if your wisdom teeth seem fine to you, and don’t really cause you any problems, but it’s been estimated up to 80% of wisdom teeth will eventually need extracting. A lack of pain doesn’t mean that everything is fine, even if they seem to have erupted normally. Another problem caused by wisdom teeth is that they can exacerbate overcrowding, making it more difficult to clean in between the teeth thoroughly.

Surgery to Remove Wisdom Teeth

You have probably heard a lot of horror stories about people having their wisdom teeth removed, but the truth is that it’s usually not complicated and really is nothing to be worried about. Most people are able to have their wisdom teeth removed relatively easily, and the surgery is quite quick. It’s likely to be done under a local anaesthetic, although you may be able to opt for a little extra sedation if you’re particularly nervous.

Afterwards the extraction site may feel a little uncomfortable, but you should be held to keep this under control with over-the-counter painkillers. The tooth socket may bleed for a while, but this should have completely ceased within 24 hours. Some people find it helpful to use moist heat to relieve any pain or discomfort, while an ice pack can be useful for reducing any swelling. Sticking to soft, easy to eat foods for a few days will allow the tooth socket to heal. Our dentist Leeds team at Leeds City Dentalcare will give you lots of advice on how to care for the extraction site, and how to keep the area clean. It is important to take a little bit of care as you don’t want to dislodge the blood clot that forms in the tooth socket. This blood clot protects the bone and nerves from infection and helps it to heal cleanly.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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Managing Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity is incredibly common, and it’s something we see in a lot of our patients and Leeds City Dentalcare. It can be temporary or permanent, and many people find exposing their teeth to hot or cold foods or specific types of foods increases sensitivity, and may even cause pain. If you do suffer from tooth sensitivity and haven’t been to the dentist Leeds for a while, then it’s worth booking appointment at our Leeds dental surgery as it could be due to an underlying oral health condition. In addition we may be able to suggest ways of lessening the sensitivity.

Reasons for Tooth Sensitivity

Tooth sensitivity can be due to a number of different reasons, and we’ve listed the most common below.

  • Brushing your teeth too hard. While it’s important to brush your teeth regularly, it’s also important not to brush them too hard or to use a toothbrush with very hard bristles. If you use too much pressure then you could damage your gums, causing them to recede, and you could brush away the tooth enamel.
  • Receding gums are another common reason for tooth sensitivity as they expose the tooth roots. The tooth roots aren’t covered in enamel, but in a substance called cementum which is much softer and easier to wear away. This increases sensitivity and leaves the tooth vulnerable to decay. Although receding gums can occur due to over brushing, they frequently pull back from the teeth due to gum disease.
  • Teeth grinding can place great stress on the teeth, wearing away or chipping the enamel, or causing small cracks to form in the teeth. Anything that damages the tooth enamel will increase sensitivity, and small cracks can open up every time you bite down allowing foods and drink to penetrate the tooth more easily.
  • Eating acidic foods can increase to sensitivity as the acid helps to wear away the protective layer of tooth enamel. The average diet has become far more acidic in recent years, increasing the likelihood of this occurring.

Methods for Preventing and Controlling Tooth Sensitivity

Having a great daily oral hygiene Leeds routine will help reduce the risk of tooth sensitivity. This is because it will help ensure the gums are healthy, and that tooth enamel is protected as much as possible against the risk of erosion and damage. An important part of this routine is to make sure you have the right tools, including a soft toothbrush with rounded bristles that won’t damage your teeth and gums. Brushing gently around the gum line will help ensure plaque and food particles are removed while not damaging this sensitive tissue.

It’s worth asking the staff at our Leeds surgery for advice on the best products to use. Many of our patients find it helpful to use toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth. These help keep the tooth enamel strong, and contain ingredients designed to block up the tiny tubules in any exposed areas of dentine. These tubules lead directly to the central pulp area, allowing hot and cold foods to be transmitted directly to the pulp, potentially causing pain and discomfort. These toothpastes have to be used consistently for several weeks as the effects slowly build up. If Dr David Brown or another of our dentists thinks your teeth are sensitive due to a highly acidic diet, then we may recommend you modify your eating habits to help counteract tooth sensitivity.

Visiting Leeds City Dentalcare for regular check-ups and cleanings is an important part of helping to prevent and control tooth sensitivity. We’ll be able to identify any potential problems so they can be treated quickly, minimising sensitivity.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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Leeds City Dentalcare Offers the Inman Aligner Orthodontic System

Do you have teeth that are overcrowded, or perhaps protruding front teeth? Would you like them to be straighter? If so the Inman Aligner Leeds may be suitable for you, and is available at Leeds City Dentalcare. One of the major advantages of this system is the speed at which it’s able to change the position of the teeth. The majority of cases can be completed in as little as four months, and possibly a lot less. Some people may need as little as 6 to 8 weeks of treatment. The exact treatment time is something that will be determined when you visit our Leeds dental surgery for your initial consultation.  It’s removable, making it super easy to keep your teeth clean during treatment.

It works through using nickel titanium coil springs to exert pressure on two aligner bows that oppose each other. There is one bow on the inner surfaces of the teeth, and another on the outer surfaces of the teeth, so the inner bow will push the teeth outwards, while the outer bow will exert an inwards force. This gentle yet active pressure gradually moves the teeth into the correct position.

Once it’s been decided that this is a suitable course of action for your particular case then treatment is relatively straightforward. We’ll simply need to take impressions of your teeth so we can fabricate your custom-made aligner. The next step is to fit the aligner, after which you’ll need to wear it for between 16 and 20 hours each day. You’ll need to come back to our Leeds surgery every 2 to 3 weeks so we can see how well the treatment is progressing. Once treatment is completed then you’ll need to wear a retainer at night in order to prevent them from moving back into their previous position.

Inman Aligners Can Be Used in a Variety of Situations

This type of aligner is suitable for both upper and lower teeth that are crowded, or can be used to close the gaps in between teeth. It’s a good treatment for front teeth that protrude, especially as the results are so quick. These aligners can be used to straighten up teeth that are unevenly aligned. These aligners are often used by Dr David Brown or another of his dentist Leeds as part of a smile makeover.

Patients looking to transform their smile often benefit from orthodontics Leeds, as very few people have naturally straight teeth. In such cases these aligners would usually be used to straighten the teeth before perfecting their smile with additional cosmetic dentistry. It’s extremely common for people having this treatment to follow it up with teeth whitening in our Leeds surgery, as this is the perfect way to show off a newly straight smile. Teeth that have a less than regular shape, or which have minor imperfections can benefit from bonding. This is where composite resin material is applied to the tooth and shaped to give the most cosmetically pleasing result. Having teeth straightened prior to veneers can mean less healthy tooth structure needs to be removed to make room for the veneers. It is a great way of keeping tooth preparation to the absolute minimum, and can give the desired results within a very short space of time.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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Having a Smile Makeover

More people are choosing to have a smile makeover Leeds as there is an increasing emphasis on having nice teeth. The truth is we often make up our minds about someone a few minutes after meeting them, and this is something that can often depend on whether or not a person smiles very much. The trouble is if you’re not happy with the way your teeth look then it can make you very self-conscious about smiling, leading to others incorrectly perceiving you as being cold or stuck up even though this could not be any further from the truth. Common reasons for wanting a smile makeover include:

  • Being unhappy with the colour of your teeth, as they may be stained or yellow
  • Having crooked teeth
  • Having gaps in between your teeth
  • Missing one or more teeth
  • Noticing your teeth appear worn down or chipped
  • Not wanting to smile in front of others
  • Being fed up with covering your mouth whenever you laugh or smile

If you are unhappy with your smile, then it may well be worth just booking a consultation with Dr David Brown or with another cosmetic dentist at our Leeds surgery. Your smile might be significantly improved through relatively conservative dental treatments, and it could be much more affordable than you’d think. Leeds City Dentalcare offers a huge range of cosmetic dental treatment, and our dentists will be able to talk you through each treatment, and how it could improve your smile. It all depends on how drastically you want to change the look of your teeth, and whether or not you have any existing problems that could affect a smile makeover.

One of the first things we will want to do is ensure your mouth is healthy and free from disease, and that you do not have any other conditions that may affect your dental health, as for instance untreated teeth grinding can cause a lot of damage to teeth and gums, and could ruin veneers or crowns. After this we will listen to you to find out which aspects of your smile you’re most unhappy with, and how you would really like your smile to look. We will let you know what can realistically be achieved through having a smile makeover Leeds, and what can be done within your budget.

The next step will be to put together a treatment plan. This will provide you with a breakdown of the different treatments involved in your smile makeover, and their cost. Of course it is up to you as to what you decide to have done, as you may wish to opt for just one treatment, or if you wish for an extensive amount of work it could well be possible to split it into manageable sections.

It might be that any work needs to be carried out in a specific order. For instance, if you want to have straighter teeth we may recommend orthodontics Leeds followed by teeth whitening and veneers. The reason for this is that your newly straightened teeth may mean you need fewer veneers to perfect your smile, and it is likely less tooth structure will need removing to fit the veneers than if you had not had braces. Teeth whitening is always best carried out before having new porcelain restorations such as veneers and crowns, as it makes it far easier to accurately match the shade. These are all details we will discuss with you during your consultation for your new smile.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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Botox Treatment at Leeds City Dentalcare

Perhaps you already know people who have had Botox, or maybe you’re just curious to learn more. While Botox is perhaps best known for smoothing away wrinkles, it also has a number of other applications including reducing excessive sweating underneath the arms and on the palms of the hands, and relieving migraines. Regardless of your reasons for wanting Botox, you can be sure the procedure is safe as possible at our Leeds surgery as you’ll receive the attention of fully qualified and experienced practitioners.

What is Botox?

Botox is a prescription medicine that is derived from botulism toxin. The botulism toxin is produced by a bacterium called Clostridium botulinum. The toxin works by blocking certain chemical signals from nerves, particularly the nerves that make muscles contract. It is a tried and tested treatment that has been used for decades and has the advantage of being far less invasive than other methods to reduce wrinkles. When injected into the face it helps to relax the muscles giving the effect of smoothing out the skin, improving the look of wrinkles. The results are temporary, but most people find the treatment will last for between three and six months before requiring a top up.

Booking a Consultation with a Qualified Practitioner

If you’re thinking about having Botox then it’s worth booking a consultation with Dr David Brown or another of our highly qualified dentist. This is because we need to ensure you don’t have any pre-existing medical conditions that may mean this isn’t the right course of action for you. We’ll take the time to explain the procedure thoroughly to you, and this is also your chance to ask any questions you may have. Although Botox can be a very effective treatment, it’s not right for everyone and may not improve the appearance of all wrinkles. You’ll get an honest opinion when visiting our dentist in Leeds surgery, as we’ll let you know the kind of results you can expect. If we don’t think it’ll make it significant difference to your appearance, or that it may not help with any other symptoms then we will let you know!

What to Expect When Having Botox

The actual process only takes between 15 minutes and half an hour and most people experience the minimum of discomfort. However it’s quite normal to experience a slight redness afterwards. It takes a few days for the treatment to begin working, but maximum results should be achieved within one to two weeks. Although you may see Botox treatments advertised elsewhere, it is essential to consult a properly trained professional as otherwise complications could arise. One of the most common side effects is simply over treating an area, creating that frozen look which isn’t particularly desirable. Risks include slight bruising around the injection site, and experiencing flu-like symptoms or even headaches.

Botox for Non-Cosmetic Reasons

Many people suffering from headaches or migraines have found Botox to be more effective than other treatments as it can help to improve the symptoms and shorten the duration of chronic migraines. Botox is injected into the neck and head to treat headaches and migraines. Botox in Leeds was discovered to reduce the symptoms of excessive sweating 20 years ago, and was the first time the toxin had been used in a non-muscular way.

Botox sometimes receives a bad press, but this is usually when it has been used incorrectly, or has been over-used by practitioners who lack the necessary experience and training to utilise it properly.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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How Does Tooth Decay Develop?

Tooth decay is extremely common, and most people will have had at least one filling by the time they reach adulthood. Although tooth decay generally occurs in children and young adults, and is one of the most common reasons younger people lose teeth, it can affect any one at any age. It’s something we see all too frequently in our Leeds surgery.

The reason it develops is down to the presence of plaque bacteria in the mouth. Everyone has these bacteria, and they live off food particles left in the mouth after eating. You can sometimes feel a sticky film over the teeth before brushing at the end of the day, and this is the plaque biofilm that is removed through brushing and flossing.

One of the most common sites for plaque is right at the back of the mouth, just above the gumline, and around the edges of fillings that may be slightly rough. Plaque begins building up on the teeth within half an hour of eating, and if not thoroughly removed will result in tooth decay. The reason for this is that plaque produces acids which will attack the enamel covering your teeth, and this process begins in as little as five minutes after eating.

Demineralisation

The acid causes a process called demineralisation to begin. This means essential minerals, such as phosphate and calcium are leached out of the enamel with the effect of softening it. At this stage your tooth enamel is more vulnerable to developing cavities as this acid erosion can lead to permanent loss of tooth enamel. The pH levels in the mouth remain acidic for at least half an hour after eating, before gradually returning to normal. At this stage a process call remineralisation begins.

Remineralisation

The minerals leeched out of the teeth during demineralisation remain in the saliva, and as the mouth becomes less acidic some of these minerals are re-deposited back into the tooth enamel, helping it to re-harden slightly. However, over time repeated acid attacks will gradually wear away the tooth enamel, leaving it more vulnerable to developing cavities.

Symptoms of early tooth decay can be easy to miss, but include noticing your teeth feel more sensitive to hot and cold foods, or that they may feel slightly achy after eating particular foods. Sometimes there may be visible signs of decay in the form of holes or pits in the teeth. Early intervention is part of the key to helping to prevent tooth decay.

Regular Check-ups

This is one of the reasons why we recommend you visit our Leeds City Dentalcare at six monthly intervals for a check-up. Dr David Brown, or another of our skilled dentists will be able to detect any early signs of tooth decay. They’ll do this by probing the tooth very gently to discover if the enamel is softer, or may take dental x-rays to identify small pockets of decay in hidden areas such as the contact areas between the teeth. Early detection means they can be treated far more easily. You’ll keep more of your tooth structure, treatment will be quicker as any fillings will be smaller, and it’ll be cheaper.

Watching your diet can also help, as frequent snacking will increase the number of times your teeth are exposed to acid. Eating sticky foods such as crisps and biscuits will also increase your risk. If you want a snack in between meals then try to aim for more tooth friendly foods such as cheese or crunchy vegetables.

Dr. David S Brown

David is principal dentist & clinical director of Leeds City Dentalcare. Having graduated at Leeds University & at the Royal College of Surgeons, London, he joined the practice in 1990 & took over as principal in 1992. He has a passion for ensuring that we are equipped with the very latest & finest equipment available securing our place as one of the best equipped practices in Yorkshire.

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